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Greg Cox

Scene By Scene: STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN – Pt III – ‘Something We Can Transplant’

As voted for on Twitter by followers, I will be analysing Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan scene by scene in this multi-part exploration of Nicholas Meyer’s 1982 sequel…

Star Trek and God have an interesting relationship. For a show revolving around scientific discovery and set in the cosmos, the franchise frequently returns to Biblical allegory and religious mystery. The Wrath of Khan is no exception, even for an ostensibly secular film.

How else can the Genesis Project be defined than the product of a God complex? The scientists of space station Regula 1, as directed by Dr. Carol Marcus, are well aware of how powerful the Genesis device is. “We are dealing with something that could be perverted into a dreadful weapon” agonises her son and fellow scientist, David, in the wake of being contacted by the U.S.S. Reliant as they scout out test sites for the project. These are scientists tethered to the Federation but not driven by Starfleet’s rhetoric who appreciate they have the power to create or destroy life, and David seems positively terrified that Starfleet itself could be inviolate, could corrupt their science. “Every time we have dealings with Starfleet, I get nervous…”. It would be hard to imagine Gene Roddenberry’s pure vision of humanity’s future space navy containing any suggestions they could warp the power of God.

Nicholas Meyer, in his humanistic and flawed version of the 23rd century, is far less convinced of Starfleet’s purity. He has lived through the horror of Vietnam just a decade before his take on Star Trek’s future, having witnessed progressive democracies almost destroyed by ideological fear, not to mention raised in the shadow of Hiroshima and the work of Robert Oppenheimer, a scientist whose noble actions led to a century-defining blight on American history. The Regula scientists react in horror at Reliant’s Captain Terrell openly wondering if the life signs detected on Ceti Alpha VI (or what they *think* to be Ceti Alpha VI) can be transplanted. ”It might only be a particle of preanimate matter”. The Federation already have powers over matter and space that would have been considered God-like to earlier humanity and Carol Marcus chafes at his casual lack of humility in the face of such power.

Little do any of them realise that on the surface of the planet lies an expression of corrupted humanity, a sundered ‘God’ resting in his own personal Dante’s inferno.

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Star Trek: The Next Generation – ‘Q-Strike’

In an attempt to try and tackle the onerous job of looking into the Star Trek book universe, thanks to the help of Memory Beta’s chronology section, I am intending to look at the saga in book form from stories which take place earliest in the franchise’s timeline onwards. This hopefully should provide an illuminating and unusual way of examining the extended Star Trek universe.

Part of this story takes place 600,000 years ago.

The conclusion of Greg Cox’s three-part exploration of the Q Continuum brings proceedings to a natural and understandable close, as Q manages to win the day over the evil entity 0 (aka Nil) and save reality as we know it. ‘Q-Strike’, thankfully, despite being the longest of the three books, also comes off as the breeziest read of the trilogy.

‘Q-Zone’ spent a significant amount of the page count establishing the central relationship between Q and Nil, which very much reflected an abusive friendship or destructive father/son dynamic; Nil presented himself as a cool, dangerous and exciting role model, but in short order proved thanks to his devastating destruction of the Tkon Empire, when they dared to challenge his omnipotence, that he was little more than a self-aggrandising bully who simply wanted to treat mortals in the universe as his play things. The Q we have seen across The Next Generation and later in Voyager has always been considered to be the ultimate omnipotent trickster, but he never overstepped the boundaries into outright genocide. What ‘Q-Strike’ does is play the line between making Q much more *human* in terms of his character and give him certain shades of grey on his moral compass.

Star Trek: The Next Generation – ‘Q-Zone’

In an attempt to try and tackle the onerous job of looking into the Star Trek book universe, thanks to the help of Memory Beta’s chronology section, I am intending to look at the saga in book form from stories which take place earliest in the franchise’s timeline onwards. This hopefully should provide an illuminating and unusual way of examining the extended Star Trek universe.

Part of this story takes place 1 billion years ago.

The middle part of any trilogy can be tricky, and Greg Cox’s ‘Q-Zone’ suffers from such pacing and momentum issues as he continues weaving the interesting backstory of Q, the all-powerful being who has tormented Captain Picard and the Enterprise-D crew from The Next Generation pilot onwards. If ‘Q-Space’ established the problem and the stakes, ‘Q-Zone’ adds the context we need to understand what not just Picard and his crew, but the entire universe, are facing.

Star Trek has a fascinating relationship with God, and or Gods. It doesn’t really know what to do with them. The Original Series often made them strange, meddlesome or simply annoying. The Next Generation held a firmly atheist, rigid orthodox view that there was no Almighty, and indeed Q was the perfect example of that; he was the culmination of the message Gene Roddenberry wanted to convey all along, that he might be fascinated by God, but he doesn’t really believe anyone all-powerful is all-knowing, given how frequently Q ends up proving he’s little more than an omnipotent trickster. Deep Space Nine, perhaps because it was more egalitarian in how it developed a galaxy of species, built its whole mythology around the Prophets and a belief in more than just scientific ‘wormhole aliens’. Subsequent series, on the whole, tended to avoid the thorny subject altogether.

Star Trek: The Next Generation – ‘Q-Space’

In an attempt to try and tackle the onerous job of looking into the Star Trek book universe, thanks to the help of Memory Beta’s chronology section, I am intending to look at the saga in book form from stories which take place earliest in the franchise’s timeline onwards. This hopefully should provide an illuminating and unusual way of examining the extended Star Trek universe.

Part of this story takes place 5 billion years ago.

Star Trek in many ways was forever changed by the character of Q, who first appeared in The Next Generation’s pilot episode ‘Encounter at Farpoint’, played with delightfully sadistic joie de vivre by John de Lancie, and who grew to be, aside from the Borg, probably Captain Jean-Luc Picard’s greatest antagonist across the run of the series.

Q, of course, is an omnipotent being, who we later discover is part of the Q Continuum, which exists on a different plane of existence, containing a race of beings all known as Q who appear to have complete dominance over time, space and matter. They are the ultimate personification of a God, with all the powers of a God in-between. Q wasn’t by any means the first time Star Trek had toyed with the idea of a God-like being, of course; The Original Series has Captain Kirk’s USS Enterprise bump into a God-like entity ever other week – indeed many speculated after ‘Encounter at Farpoint’ that the mischievous Trelane from ‘The Squire of Gothos’ could have been a Q. The only difference is that few of them had the scope, reach and power of the Continuum. Q, literally, can do anything, be anyone and go anywhere, any*when*. That, as a concept, was always going to be a game-changer.

‘Q-Space’, therefore, attempts to dig deeper into the Q Continuum than certainly many of the TV series which featured Q were ever able to do. The first of a trilogy badged under ‘The Q Continuum’ prefix from writer Greg Cox, ‘Q-Space’ takes a cue (pun probably intended) from half a dozen concepts from both The Next Generation, The Original Series and indeed Voyager, and begins working to craft them into a broader, intertextual narrative which shines a light on Q’s history, his home, and give Picard and his crew one of their most cosmic adventures to date. Cox has an ambitious reach for this trilogy and while ‘Q-Space’ perhaps takes too long getting to the core point of what it’s trying to achieve, some exciting building blocks are placed across the novel.