Goodfellas

New Podcast: MOTION PICTURES #6 – ‘Scorsese & Marvel: Civil War’ (The Irishman)

The latest episode of my podcast about cinema with my friend and podcast buddy, Carl Sweeney.

Motion Pictures is designed to be more of an informal, free-flowing chat about movies, geared around a topic of the week. There will also be choice episodes around an idea, whatever takes our fancy really! It’s an exciting project.

As The Irishman arrives on the scene, we’re this week discussing Martin Scorsese, Marvel and ask the question…

What exactly is cinema?

In the last few months, Scorsese and Marvel have, via Film Twitter, been at war, after Scorsese described the Marvel cinematic juggernaut as “not cinema”. Is he right? Is he wrong? Does it matter? Is the answer less important than people’s reaction to it?

It seems to have triggered a debate over the direction of modern cinema. Blockbuster franchises vs smaller fare. Distribution models with Netflix bankrolling The Irishman when major studios wouldn’t. Are we facing cinematic hegemony? Or is the market simply evolving & adapting?

And crucially, is there art or craft in Black Panther to the same degree as The Irishman or Goodfellas? Worlds apart in tone and texture, do they all apply as pure cinema?

From the Vault #10: GOODFELLAS (1990)

From 2012 onwards, before developing this blog, I wrote a multitude of reviews on the website Letterboxd. In this irregular series called From the Vault, I’m going to haul these earlier reviews out of mothballs and re-purpose them here.

This one is from April 26th, 2014, revisited with Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman having landed…

David Chase, creator of hit HBO series The Sopranos, once described Goodfellas as ‘my Koran’ and it’s very easy to see why. Martin Scorsese’s epic crime drama about the rise & fall of Henry Hill, and through him the mythology of the ‘gangster’, truly is a remarkable piece of cinema from start to finish.

What Scorsese does is paint a vivid, kinetic portrait of a descent into fame & fortune, glamorising the so called ‘wise guy’ without oddly enough ever making it appealing. In adapting Nicholas Pileggi’s book about Hill, Wiseguy, Scorsese manages in many respects to tell a cautionary tale about the perils of, as Henry himself puts it from his very first line of a continuous narration, ‘always wanting to be a gangster’. Goodfellas shows that while it may in some respects be a charmed life, it’s also a hollow existence fraught with unexpected danger, paranoia & viciousness that can destroy the souls of men.

Scorsese shows that in magnificently entertaining fashion, both visually, through a sublime screenplay, and some peerless acting.